4 Easy Steps to Disable a Team

Breaking the spirit of a team is simple. Here are four easy steps to successfully halt the evolution of any team’s growth.

Step One

Avoid conflict at all costs. It doesn’t feel good and it requires considering other frames of reference. Take the easiest path to reach the goal with the least possible friction. Do not concern yourself with contrary opinions as they only create discomfort and slow the process.

Step Two

Steer away from commitments that require discipline. The real world has too many unforeseen obstacles to expect accountability. Those who are counting on the outcomes you promised will understand when things don’t go as planned. Lower the pressure and take it easy.

Step Three

Stick to what has worked in the past. Stretching limits leads to risk and risks lead to danger. Play it safe. You’re better off letting others make the mistakes and learning from their errors. Pushing innovation causes anxiety and stress inevitably forces change. Change hurts.

Step Four

Broadcast your dissatisfaction with anything that changes. Telegraph displeasure in a way that ensures the world will understand the depth of your pain. Wait as long as you can to begin solving the problem. Focus the majority of your energy on venting and experience the support of your peers when the contagiousness of your expression alters their moods until they become a perfect reflection of yours. Misery loves company.

You’ve done it! You’ve now successfully broken the spirit of your team. You’ve spared yourself the expenditure of investment. You’ve eluded the consequences of trust. You’ve shielded yourself from the fear of innovation. You’ve fended off any expectation to cope with change effectively. Nothing has been ventured. Nothing has been gained. The world stays exactly the same even though time has marched on. Phew!

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Comments

  • Jan Clavey  On July 11, 2013 at 5:02 pm

    Ha ha. Why does this sound like a conversation we might have with our kids?

  • Roxy Cross  On July 11, 2013 at 11:33 pm

    Amazing the sheer number of incidents I have witnessed that came to mind reading this! And like Jan mentioned, with kids, business, previous relationships, working relationships… I believe it is rampant and you nailed the issues on the head! Thanks Steve!

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